83 Chapters
  Title Author Publisher Format Buy Remix
Medium 9781574415933

Ship of Fools the Film

Edited by Thomas Austenfeld UNT Press ePub

Ship of Fools the Film

Christine Hait

The present volume celebrates the fiftieth anniversary of Katherine Anne Porter’s Ship of Fools by bringing the novel into conversation with the various Ships of Fools that preceded it, including Sebastian Brant’s and Alexander Barclay’s. Another Ship of Fools merits inclusion in this fleet, the Ship of Fools that Porter’s novel inspired: director Stanley Kramer’s 1965 film version of the novel. Porter scholars typically put the novel and Kramer’s film in an exclusive relationship, focusing on the translation of the novel to film and asking questions about the film that lead back to the novel. Understandably, they probe the film for assistance in the ongoing effort to accurately evaluate the novel. Especially when understood in a variety of contexts, the film does help with the evaluation of the novel. The film can be placed in the context of films from 1965 that look back at the rise of Hitler and its aftermath.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253022790

Waitin’ fer the Cat to Die

James Whitcomb Riley Indiana University Press ePub

LAWZY! don’t I rickollect

That-’air old swing in the lane!

Right and proper, I expect,

Old times can’t come back again;

But I want to state, ef they

Could come back, and I could say

What my pick ’ud be, i jing!

I’d say, Gimme the old swing

’Nunder the old locus’-trees

On the old place, ef you please!—

Danglin’ there with half-shet eye,

Waitin’ fer the cat to die!

I’d say, Gimme the old gang

Of barefooted, hungry, lean,

Ornry boys you want to hang

When you’re growed up twic’t as mean!

The old gyarden-patch, the old

Truants, and the stuff we stol’d!

The old stompin’-groun’, where we

Wore the grass off, wild and free

As the swoop of the old swing,

Where we ust to climb and cling,

And twist roun’, and fight, and lie—

Waitin’ fer the cat to die!

’Pears like I ’most allus could

Swing the highest of the crowd—

Jes sail up there tel I stood

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253022790

Envoy

James Whitcomb Riley Indiana University Press ePub

MANY pleasures of youth have been buoyantly sung—

And, borne on the winds of delight, may they beat

With their palpitant wings at the hearts of the Young,

And in bosoms of Age find as warm a retreat!—

Yet sweetest of all of the musical throng,

Though least of the numbers that upward aspire,

Is the one rising now into wavering song,

As I sit in the silence and gaze in the fire.

’Tis a Winter long dead that beleaguers my door

And muffles his steps in the snows of the past:

And I see, in the embers I’m dreaming before,

Lost faces of love as they looked on me last:—

The round, laughing eyes of the desk-mate of old

Gleam out for a moment with truant desire—

Then fade and are lost in a City of Gold,

As I sit in the silence and gaze in the fire.

And then comes the face, peering back in my own,

Of a shy little girl, with her lids drooping low,

As she faltering tells, in a far-away tone,

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253022790

Pet Coon, The

James Whitcomb Riley Indiana University Press ePub

NOEY Bixler ketched him, and fetched him in to me

When he’s ist a little teenty-weenty baby-coon

’Bout as big as little pups, an’ tied him to a tree;

An’ Pa gived Noey fifty cents, when he come home at noon.

Nen he buyed a chain fer him, an’ little collar, too,

An’ sawed a hole in a’ old tub an’ turnt it upside-down;

An’ little feller’d stay in there and won’t come out fer you—

Tendin’ like he’s kindo’ skeered o’ boys ’at lives in town.

Now he aint afeard a bit! he’s ist so fat an’ tame,

We on’y chain him up at night, to save the little chicks.

Holler “Greedy! Greedy!” to him, an’ he knows his name,

An’ here he’ll come a-waddle-un, up fer any tricks!

He’ll climb up my leg, he will, an’ waller in my lap,

An’ poke his little black paws ’way in my pockets where

They’s beechnuts, er chinkypins, er any little scrap

Of anything, ’at’s good to eat—an’ he don’t care!

An’ he’s as spunky as you please, an’ don’t like dogs at all.—

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253022790

Pixy People, The

James Whitcomb Riley Indiana University Press ePub

IT was just a very

Merry fairy dream!—

All the woods were airy

With the gloom and gleam;

Crickets in the clover

Clattered clear and strong,

And the bees droned over

Their old honey-song.

In the mossy passes,

Saucy grasshoppers

Leapt about the grasses

And the thistle-burs;

And the whispered chuckle

Of the katydid

Shoot the honeysuckle

Blossoms where he hid.

Through the breezy mazes

Of the lazy June,

Drowsy with the hazes,

Of the dreamy noon,

Little Pixy people

Winged above the walk,

Pouring from the steeple

Of a mullein-stalk.

One—a gallant fellow—

Evidently King,—

Wore a plume of yellow

In a jewelled ring

On a pansy bonnet,

Gold and white and blue,

With the dew still on it,

And the fragrance, too.

One—a dainty lady,—

Evidently Queen,—

Wore a gown of shady

Moonshine and green,

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253022790

Circus-Day Parade, The

James Whitcomb Riley Indiana University Press ePub

OH, THE Circus-Day parade! How the bugles played and played!

And how the glossy horses tossed their flossy manes, and neighed,

As the rattle and the rhyme of the tenor-drummer’s time

Filled all the hungry hearts of us with melody sublime!

How the grand band-wagon shone with a splendor all its own,

And glittered with a glory that our dreams had never known!

And how the boys behind, high and low of every kind,

Marched in unconscious capture, with a rapture undefined!

How the horsemen, two and two, with their plumes of white and blue,

And crimson, gold and purple, nodding by at me and you,

Waved the banners that they bore, as the Knights in days of yore,

Till our glad eyes gleamed and glistened like the spangles that they wore!

How the graceless-graceful stride of the elephant was eyed,

And the capers of the little horse that cantered at his side!

How the shambling camels, tame to the plaudits of their fame,

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253022790

Curly Locks

James Whitcomb Riley Indiana University Press ePub

CURLY Locks! Curly Locks! wilt thou be mine?

Thou shalt not wash the dishes, nor yet feed the swine,—

But sit on a cushion and sew a fine seam,

And feast upon strawberries, sugar and cream.

Curly Locks! Curly Locks! wilt thou be mine?

The throb of my heart is in every line,

And the pulse of a passion as airy and glad

In its musical beat as the little Prince had!

Thou shalt not wash the dishes, nor yet feed the swine!—

O I’ll dapple thy hands with these kisses of mine

Till the pink of the nail of each finger shall be

As a little pet blush in full blossom for me.

But sit on a cushion and sew a fine seam,

And thou shalt have fabric as fair as a dream,—

The red of my veins, and the white of my love,

And the gold of my joy for the braiding thereof.

And feast upon strawberries, sugar and cream

From a service of silver, with jewels agleam,—

At thy feet will I bide, at thy beck will I rise,

See All Chapters
Medium 9781607059974

Neat Men’s Necktie

Annabel Wrigley FunStitch Studio ePub

a teeny bit more challenging

Neat Men’s Necktie

What Do I Need?

Old necktie (Thrift shops usually have a huge supply for a dollar or so.)

1¼ yards of fabric OR a piece of fabric measuring 20˝ × 39˝; you should cut your fabric so that the tie pattern is running parallel to the selvage (Since you can make 2 ties from the 1¼ yards, you could share the fabric with a friend.)

10˝ × 10˝ piece of a contrasting fabric

Coordinating sewing thread

Basic sewing supplies

special skills

Refer to The Rules of Sewing

Using an iron

Prepare the Pieces

1.Using your seam ripper, carefully unpick the entire tie, starting at the back seam.

Thinking of a neat gift for Dad? I don’t think you can beat a super-smart-looking necktie made by you! Pick a cute yet manly fabric and craft the perfect gift for your pop.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253022790

Bumblebee, The

James Whitcomb Riley Indiana University Press ePub

YOU better not fool with a Bumblebee!—

Ef you don’t think they can sting—you’ll see!

They’re lazy to look at, an’ kindo’ go

Buzzin’ an’ bummin’ aroun’ so slow,

An’ ac’ so slouchy an’ all fagged out,

Danglin’ their legs as they drone about

The hollyhawks ’at they can’t climb in

’Ithout ist a-tumble-un out agin!

Wunst I watched one climb clean ’way

In a jim’son-blossom, I did, one day,—

An’ I ist grabbed it—an’ nen let go—

An’ “Ooh-ooh! Honey! I told ye so!”

Says The Raggedy Man; an’ he ist run

An’ pullt out the stinger, an’ don’t laugh none,

An’ says: “They has ben folks, I guess,

’At thought I wuz predjudust, more er less,—

Yit I still muntain ’at a Bumblebee

Wears out his welcome too quick fer me!”

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253022790

South Wind and the Sun, The

James Whitcomb Riley Indiana University Press ePub

O THE South Wind and the Sun

How each loved the other one—

Full of fancy—full of folly—

Full of jollity and fun!

How they romped and ran about,

Like two boys when school is out,

With glowing face, and lisping lip,

Low laugh, and lifted shout!

And the South Wind—he was dressed

With a ribbon round his breast

That floated, flapped and fluttered

In a riotous unrest,

And a drapery of mist

From the shoulder and the wrist

Flowing backward with the motion

Of the waving hand he kissed.

And the Sun had on a crown

Wrought of gilded thistledown,

And a scarf of velvet vapor,

And a raveled-rainbow gown;

And his tinsel-tangled hair,

Tossed and lost upon the air,

Was glossier and flossier

Than any anywhere.

And the South Wind’s eyes were two

Little dancing drops of dew,

As he puffed his cheeks, and pursed his lips,

And blew and blew and blew!

See All Chapters
Medium 9781574415933

Paratexts and the Rhetorical Factor in Literature

Edited by Thomas Austenfeld UNT Press ePub

Paratexts and the Rhetorical Factor in Literature

Joachim Knape

As a rhetorician, I did not take Thomas Austenfeld’s invitation to compare Sebastian Brant's Narrenschiff (1494) and Katherine Anne Porter’s Ship of Fools (1962) for granted. When working within a strictly defined theoretical framework of rhetoric, it is not obvious that rhetorical analysis is appropriate for the fields of art and literature. If it is, then such an analysis must deal with a series of specific theoretical problems and challenges. In what follows, I will raise a few fundamental questions:

And finally, a methodological problem:

My essay is an attempt to find initial answers to these questions. In this introduction I can only briefly touch on the problems listed above; I have written more extensively elsewhere.1 First, the general question about communication. Within the construct of modern aesthetics, it is not self-evident that literature is both an art and a communicative fact. Since the beginning of the so-called Art Period in the eighteenth century and the emergence of the l’art pour l’art ideology, an idea of the autonomy of artistic work has developed. This has culminated in the contemporary idea of performance: that the meaning and purpose of an artistic work only emerges in the moment of its performance. Artistic messages are thus a phenomenon of a situatively linked emergence.2 With reference to literature, this means that poets write only for themselves and then leave us their texts as mere stimuli for our own individual games. In this way, perhaps literature that has been fully detached from its author, like every other form of art, leads to an original experience of being.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253022790

Grandfather Squeers

James Whitcomb Riley Indiana University Press ePub

“MY grandfather Squeers,” said The Raggedy Man,

As he solemnly lighted his pipe and began—

“The most indestructible man, for his years,

And the grandest on earth, was my grandfather Squeers!

“He said, when he rounded his three-score-and-ten,

‘I’ve the hang of it now and can do it again!’

“He had frozen his heels so repeatedly, he

Could tell by them just what the weather would be;

“And would laugh and declare, ‘while the Almanac would

Most falsely prognosticate, he never could!’

“Such a hale constitution had grandfather Squeers

That, ’though he’d used ‘navy’ for sixty odd years,

“He still chewed a dime’s-worth six days of the week,

While the seventh he passed with a chew in each cheek:

“Then my grandfather Squeers had a singular knack

Of sitting around on the small of his back,

“With his legs like a letter Y stretched o’er the grate

Wherein ’twas his custom to ex-pec-tor-ate.

See All Chapters
Medium 9780253022790

Runaway Boy, The

James Whitcomb Riley Indiana University Press ePub

WUNST I sassed my Pa, an’ he

Won’t stand that, an’ punished me,—

Nen when he was gone that day,

I slipped out an’ runned away.

I tooked all my copper-cents,

An’ clumbed over our back fence

In the jimpson-weeds ’at growed

Ever’where all down the road.

Nen I got out there, an’ nen

I runned some—an’ runned again

When I met a man ’at led

A big cow ’at shooked her head.

I went down a long, long lane

Where was little pigs a-play’n’;

An’ a grea’-big pig went “Booh!”

An’ jumped up, an’ skeered me too.

Nen I scampered past, an’ they

Was somebody hollered “Hey!”

An’ I ist looked ever’where,

An’ they was nobody there.

I Want to, but I’m ’fraid to try

To go back. . . . An’ by-an’-by

Somepin’ hurts my throat inside—

An’ I want my Ma—an’ cried.

Nen a grea’-big girl come through

Where’s a gate, an’ telled me who

Am I? an’ ef I tell where

See All Chapters
Medium 9781574415933

Transnationalizing Porter’s Germans in Stanley Kramer’s Ship of Fools (1965)

Edited by Thomas Austenfeld UNT Press ePub

Transnationalizing Porter’s Germans in Stanley Kramer’s Ship of Fools (1965)

Anne-Marie Scholz

In the mid-twentieth century and just prior to the onset of mass commercial air travel, the transatlantic voyage provided novelists and filmmakers with a potent metaphor to gauge the relationship between tourism, travel, and the meaning and significance of "transnational" forms of interaction and transformation. An intriguing example of such an effort is the Jewish-American filmmaker Stanley Kramer’s 1965 adaptation of Katherine Anne Porter’s 1962 novel Ship of Fools. In her novel, Porter transformed the medieval German satire Das Narrenschiff into a modern narrative about transatlantic travel. Her version tells the story of a group of German, Spanish, and American as well as Swiss, Cuban, and Mexican passengers en route on the passenger ship Vera from Veracruz, Mexico, to Bremerhaven, Germany. It is set in the historically significant period of the early 1930s, when the Nazis were first coming into power. This essay will evaluate the ways that the metaphor of transnational travel was used to examine the meanings of "Germanness" in this period. It will also consider how these American depictions were received by German reviewers and critics in both West and East Germany.1

See All Chapters
Medium 9781607059974

Cozy Pet Bed

Annabel Wrigley FunStitch Studio ePub

easy peasy

Cozy Pet Bed

Finished Size: approximately 26˝ × 26˝

What Do I Need?

1⅝ yards of heavy decorator-weight fabric

26˝ × 26˝ pillow form

1 ball of yarn for pom-poms

Pinking shears (optional—refer to the tip)

Basic sewing supplies

special skills

•Refer to The Rules of Sewing

• Using an iron

• Making pom-poms

• Sewing around a corner

Prepare the Pieces

1.Cut 1 piece of fabric to measure 26¾˝ × 26¾˝ for the front.

2.Cut 2 pieces of fabric to measure 19˝ × 26¾˝ for the back.

TIP

Cut the pieces as shown. This is especially important if your fabric is narrower than 54˝.

Let’s Make It

If you are using a ¼˝ presser foot, don’t forget to use washi tape as a guide to make the correct seam allowance width for this project.

See All Chapters

Load more