168 Chapters
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Medium 9781574410761

Salads and Dressings

Patty Vineyard MacDonald University of North Texas Press PDF

97

Salads and Dressings

A few things to remember:

Before unmolding, moisten both the plate and the molded salad with wet fingers. The moist surfaces make it easy to slide the mold into the center of the plate after unmolding.

To unmold salads quickly, dip the molds in hot water, then loosen sides with a silver knife. Tap it with your hand and the salad will come out easily.

Remember that everything shows in a molded salad, so when adding fruit, bear in mind that:

These Fruits Sink: Canned apricots, Royal Anne cherries, canned peaches and pears, whole strawberries, prunes and plums, fresh orange sections, grapes.

These Fruits Float: Fresh apple cubes, banana slices, grapefruit sections, fresh peach or pear slices, raspberries, strawberry halves, marshmallows, broken nutmeats.

Jello and gelatin are not the same, so watch your recipes and use whichever is called for.

Add whatever you are adding to the gelatin mix ONLY when the mixture is thoroughly chilled or even partly congealed. If you are making a pattern, allow a thin layer of gelatin to “set” before you begin.

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Medium 9781574414929

Breads

Patty Vineyard MacDonald University of North Texas Press ePub

Yeast Breads and Quick Breads

Did you know that white bread was made only for royalty in Roman times? (Now royalty is looking for some good whole-wheat or rye bread.)

.   .   .

Your bread recipe reads: “knead until smooth and satiny.” How long is that? You’ve never made bread before! Most doughs require from 8 to 10 minutes of kneading before you recognize a smooth and satiny surface. After 10 minutes, grasp the dough in one hand, squeezing it slightly with your fingers. If fully developed, the opposite side of the dough ball should feel smoothly taut; you will see bubbly blisters under the surface.

Yeast bread likes a warm draft-free and moist place for rising. If you don’t have a cozy, private nook for “proofing” (raising) dough, make a “mini sauna” in your oven. Turn your oven to 400° for one minute only and then turn it off. It should have reached a temperature between 80° and 100°—just what the dough likes. Situate your dough in the warm oven so it has plenty of room to rise. Place a pan of hot water on the oven floor before closing the door. Or place dough in bowl beside your stove, turn one burner on to low. Be sure to cover the bread with a towel or napkin if proofing outside the oven. [Before putting yeast bread dough aside to rise, roll the ball of dough inside a heavily greased bowl to coat all sides and prevent it from drying out while it rises.—Editor]

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Medium 9781574411362

All Outdoors

Mary Faulk Koock University of North Texas Press ePub

ALL OUTDOORS

The Bill Kuykendall ranch is indeed one of the prettiest spots in Hays County. Alice and Bill Kuykendall live in the long rambling ranch house which rises naturally out of the green land!

Bill also rises high and naturally out of the land—he would perish I’m sure if he ever tried to live away from it and the Great Out of Doors. His innate knowledge of nature is extensive and diversified. I would say that he is an authority on birds and bees, certainly, but also grass, wildflowers, cattle, horses, polo, hunting—as the rare trophies in his game room prove—fishing, wild game, gardening and camping, and quite expert in outdoor cooking. He is one outdoorsman who could live well with only a rifle, lasso or fishing rod. Some of the food Bill cooks outdoors may seem a little dramatic to some of us—like the calf’s head he cooks underground; or barbecuing mountain oysters; or frying fish down by Onion Creek—but to Bill it’s an everyday-occurrence sort of thing and he does it with a minimum amount of effort and much to the delight of his company, whether they be ranch hands or CITY SLICKERS!

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Medium 9781574411362

People Are Here!

Mary Faulk Koock University of North Texas Press ePub

PEOPLE ARE HERE!

“Mama! People are here!” The “People are here!” cry rang through the house with much excitement, relayed by various sizes of children with the same alarm as “The British are coming!” People were here! Lots of people had always been here at Green Pastures as long as I could remember. There were five of us children who had grown up in the big frame country house: nieces, nephews and cousins had come to live with us while attending school in Austin, and many others whose extended “visits” had lasted anything up to three years. If clients of my father were lonely, he’d send them out for a week or two’s “pepper-upper” with his favorite diet of *Hot Water Corn Bread and the fresh buttermilk which Mama churned daily. But this time when the people were here, it was different. These people would be paying to be at Green Pastures—we were in business.

I had always been the one in the family to be in charge of getting ready for company dinner, planning the parties, decorating the house—after recruiting all sorts of “free” help, of course. I remember so well getting ready for a party Camille Long and I gave when we were in junior high school. Colored bread had just come into style, and Good Housekeeping magazine had a section on party sandwiches. We made pink and green ribbon sandwiches, solid pink rolled sandwiches, and pink and white checkerboard sandwiches—all day! We also made pecan fudge with heavy cream. We had an electric milk separator which separated the milk from the cream, and this cream was much heavier than whipped cream and made terrific fudge. We also thought it would really be gay to give out fancy paper caps at the party, such as we’d seen at a New Year’s Eve party in a movie; so we cut the colored crepe paper and white tissue paper for fringed tassels, but didn’t have time to put them together, as making the sandwiches and fudge had taken the entire day. I desperately took all the cap-makings in to Captain Tally and Daddy, who were upstairs visiting. Captain Tally was eighty-five years old and had been a trail-driver all his life. Making party caps wasn’t quite his forte—neither was it Daddy’s, which he made clear as he disapprovingly wrapped the thread to secure the tassel on the end of the cap and expounded on how we were spending entirely too much time on the frivolities of life. I donned my pink organdy party dress with picoted ruffles and sallied down the stairs to greet the guests who were coming to dance to the music of our new Panatrope—which Daddy had taken as payment for a case.

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Medium 9781574410761

Dessert Sauces

Patty Vineyard MacDonald University of North Texas Press PDF

316

The Best From Helen Corbitt’s Kitchens

The extravagant corner of your emergency shelf should contain a jar of

Melba Sauce—to dress up canned fruits and vanilla or peach ice cream for the unexpected guests. Or make your own! It is such a pretty color.

MELBA SAUCE

1 cup

1 cup frozen raspberries and juice, defrosted

1 teaspoon sugar

1 teaspoon cornstarch

[½ cup currant jelly (optional)]

Mix raspberries, sugar and cornstarch; cook over low heat until clear.

Strain through a fine sieve and cool. The addition of ½ cup currant jelly gives a sparkle to its color.

The famous Peach Melba is a good company dessert; it is merely vanilla or peach ice cream mounded in the center of half a canned or fresh stewed peach and covered with Melba Sauce. Named for the famous singer.

Reader’s Request

I am always amused at the sophisticates who ask for this recipe. When they find it has peanut butter in it, the reaction is always the same—

”Oh, Helen, really!”

PEANUT BUTTER SAUCE

2 cups

1 cup sugar

1 tablespoon white corn syrup

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Medium 9781574416282

Stories and Recipes from the Blackland Prairies

Frances B. Vick (Editor) University of North Texas Press PDF

Stories and

Recipes from the Blackland

Prairies*

This area of about 12 million acres, while called a “prairie,” has much timber along the streams, including a variety of oaks, pecan, elm, bois d’arc, and mesquite. In its native state, it was largely a grassy plain—the first native grassland in the westward extension of the Southern Forest region.

Most of this fertile area has been cultivated, and only small acreages of grassland remain in original vegetation. In heavily grazed pastures, the tall bunchgrass has been replaced by buffalograss,

Texas grama, and other less productive grasses. Mesquite, lotebush, and other woody plants have invaded the grasslands.

The original grass vegetation includes big and little bluestem, indiangrass, switchgrass, sideoats grama, hairy grama, tall dropseed,

Texas wintergrass, and buffalograss. Non-grass vegetation is largely legumes and composites.

*Stephan L. Hatch, Texas Almanac, 2014–2015, Elizabeth Cruce Alvarez, editor (Austin: Texas State Historical Association), 115. Used with permission of Texas State Historical Association.

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Medium 9781574414929

Helen Corbitt’s Story

Patty Vineyard MacDonald University of North Texas Press ePub

Helen Corbitt’s Story

With little more than soufflés and sass, Helen Corbitt became a food legend. This brash transplanted Yankee firebrand waged her own revolution on the naive palates of hungry Texans. She once claimed to have brought elegance to the Lone Star State, an imagined slur that caused the Texas food writers to rise up in wrath. “I couldn’t believe the food they were eating,” she said about her early days in Texas. “Chicken fried steak, I couldn’t eat one yet. Everything overcooked, salads over-dressed.”1 Inevitably, her innovations came to define our culinary standards and this outlander, hatched in the northern woods, was eventually named one of the ten most influential women in Texas.

Stanley Marcus, scion of the famous Dallas mercantile family and a renowned taste-maker himself, declared Helen “the Balenciaga of Food,”2 referring to the great post-war Spanish fashion designer known for classic lines and elegance. Earl Wilson described her simply as “the best cook in Texas.”3 She was the 1968 recipient of the solid gold Escoffier plaque from the Confrérie de la Chaîne des Rôtisseurs, the world’s oldest gourmet society, founded in 1248. It is unclear how she managed to keep their requisite ancient vow “never to desecrate a roast by cooking it in any other way than on a turning spit.”4 She was also an honorary member of the exclusive gourmet society Confrérie des Chevaliers du Tastevin,5 which resulted in her assessment “the Châine has more fun.”6

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Medium 9781574414929

Salads and Dressings

Patty Vineyard MacDonald University of North Texas Press ePub

Salads and Dressings

There is nothing quite as cool as a shimmering molded salad. Every kitchen, regardless of size, should support a few molds of various shapes, inexpensive or otherwise, but decorative. You may turn out some works of art as your imagination runs riot. Just give everything enough time: allow at least 3 hours for gelatin to “set”—six hours is better—and when making a large mold for a summertime meal, make the day before you use it.

.   .   .

A few things to remember:

Before unmolding, moisten both the plate and the molded salad with wet fingers. The moist surfaces make it easy to slide the mold into the center of the plate after unmolding.

To unmold salads quickly, dip the molds in hot water, then loosen sides with a silver knife. Tap it with your hand and the salad will come out easily.

Remember that everything shows in a molded salad, so when adding fruit, bear in mind that:

These Fruits Sink: Canned apricots, Royal Anne cherries, canned peaches and pears, whole strawberries, prunes and plums, fresh orange sections, grapes.

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Medium 9781574412185

Secretos para una alimentación saludable

Kris Rudolph University of North Texas Press PDF

SECRETOS

PARA UNA

ALIMENTACIÓN SANA

La alimentación sana fue la que nos enseñaron en casa cuando éramos niños. Nos dijeron que debíamos seguir una dieta balanceada, comer verduras y que el postre se reservaba únicamente para ocasiones especiales. Desafortunadamente, en el mundo moderno el concepto de la buena alimentación ha cambiado. Hemos reemplazado las comidas nutritivas hechas en casa con comida rápida y nuestras alacenas están llenas de productos procesados y llenos de químicos. Todo es abundante, fácil de preparar (o por lo menos es lo que prometen las instrucciones de los paquetes) y alguien más realiza la mayor parte del trabajo. Esto hace que cocinar todo desde un principio, utilizando frutas y verduras e ingredientes de buena calidad parezca demasiado difícil y que no vale la pena perder el tiempo en ello. Este libro le demostrará que preparar comida nutritiva en casa es fácil, rápido y que vale la pena hacer el esfuerzo.

Más que 50 por ciento de la población de los Estados Unidos está excedida de peso. La nueva epidemia nacional es la obesidad, la cual es la causa directa de muchas enfermedades: cardiopatías, derrames cerebrales (embolias), diabetes, alta presión arterial, depresión y osteoartritis (400,000 muertes al año se relacionan con la obesidad). Las personas consumen más calorías de las que queman, por lo general en alimentos procesados, azúcares y carbohidratos. Nuestro estilo de vida sedentario es parte del problema, junto con las porciones cada vez más grandes que sirven en los restaurantes (Aumentar el precio y el tamaño de la porción finalmente resulta en mayores ganancias para los restaurantes). Si para redondear su “dieta moderna” toma algunos refrescos embotellados, o alguna otra bebida dulce es muy probable que tenga un problema de exceso de peso. México sigue los pasos de su vecino del norte y las enfermedades relacionadas con el sobrepeso, especialmente la diabetes, van en aumento.

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Medium 9781574414868

Cómo planear una fiesta con anticipación

Kris Rudolph University of North Texas Press ePub

Cómo planear una fiesta con anticipación

Buffet Para Una Fiesta Mexicana

Guacamole

Ensalada de nopalitos asados

Jícama con chile ancho en polvo

Albóndigas en salsa de chipotle

Camarones con pipián verde

Tinga de pollo

Frijoles de la olla

Calabacitas con jitomates, elotes y chipotle

Tortillas de maíz

Agua de jamaica

Ensalada de frutas con tequila

ALMUERZO DE VERANO

(3 platos)

Refresco de pepino y menta

Sopa de limón con cilantro

Chiles poblanos rellenos de ensalada de camarón

Mangos al brandy

CENA MENÚ 1

(4 platos)

Sopa de chayote y chile poblano

Ensalada de ceviche de camarón

Lomo de cerdo con salsa de mango y chipotle

Ejotes a la mexicana

Ensalada de fruta con tequila

CENA MENÚ II

(3 platos)

Sopa de frijol negro

Carne asada con rajas

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Medium 9781574416282

Stories and Recipes from the Cross Timbers and Prairies

Frances B. Vick (Editor) University of North Texas Press PDF

Stories and

Recipes from the Cross

Timbers and

Prairies*

Approximately 15 million acres of alternating woodlands and prairies, often called the Western Cross Timbers, constitute this region.

Sharp changes in the vegetational cover are associated with different soils and topography, but the grass composition is rather uniform.

The prairie grasses are big bluestem, little bluestem, indiangrass, switchgrass, Canada wildrye, sideoats grama, hairy grama, tall grama, tall dropseed, Texas wintergrass, blue grama, and buffalograss.

On Cross Timbers soils, the vegetation is composed of big bluestem, little bluestem, hooded windmillgrass, sand lovegrass, indiangrass, switchgrass, and many species of legumes. The woody vegetation includes shinnery, blackjack, post and live oaks.

The entire area has been invaded heavily by woody brush plants of oaks, mesquite, juniper, and other unpalatable plants that furnish little forage for livestock.

*Stephan L. Hatch, Texas Almanac, 2014–2015, Elizabeth Cruce Alvarez, editor (Austin: Texas State Historical Association), 115. Used with permission of Texas State Historical Association.

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Medium 9781574410761

Desserts

Patty Vineyard MacDonald University of North Texas Press PDF

294

The Best From Helen Corbitt’s Kitchens

Reader’s Request

What is easier or more gracious than serving Pots de Crème for dessert in the living room with coffee after dinner. The crème pots are available all over the country in china shops—so invest! Good too for holding vitamin pills, cocktail picks or whatever.

POTS DE CRÈME

For 8 except someone always wants two

3 cups half-and-half

9 egg yolks

¾ cup white sugar

¼ teaspoon salt

1½ teaspoons vanilla

Light brown sugar

[Preheat oven to 325°.] Heat the half-and-half. Beat egg yolks with sugar and salt. Beat in the hot half-and-half gradually with a French whip. Add vanilla. Strain and pour into pots de crème cups. Cover the pots and put in a pan of hot water 1-inch deep. Bake for 30 minutes or until a knife when inserted comes out clean. Remove pots and chill. Place a teaspoon of brown sugar on top of each dessert and run under the broiler to melt; cover and serve.

Use the same recipe but change the flavoring: omit the brown sugar

(brulée). Add 6 ounces semi-sweet chocolate to the hot milk for Pots de Crème au Chocolat.

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Medium 9782067181977

EMILIA-ROMAGNA

Michelin Michelin ePub

EMILIA-ROMAGNA

In Emilia-Romagna the pleasure had from food and wine is part of the local culture. There are many delights to be enjoyed: filled handmade pasta following traditional recipes, tasty charcuterie, and cheeses known around the whole world, among others. And of course to accompany these delicacies only wine will do, with those from the region often refreshing, sparkling and easy to drink. The region has fully 20 appellations. Heading towards the sea you come to the vineyards of the Colli Piacentini, followed by the Colli di Parma, then the Colli di Scandiano and the flat lands of Lambrusco (Modena and Reggio). Climbing again you reach the Colli Bolognesi, the Colli di Imola and Faenza, then the Colli di Rimini, and finish your trip in the other areas of Romagna planted to vine.

Hills under vine around Forlì

Fauxware/SHUTTERSTOCK

The terroir

With regard to wine production, there are many differences between Emilia and Romagna. To begin with, in Emilia Barbera, Croatina, Lambrusco and Fortana are some of the black varieties cultivated, while Malvasia di Candia, Montu, Ortrugo, Moscato Giallo, Pignoletto and Sauvignon are among the whites. In Romagna, on the other hand, you find Sangiovese and Montepulciano for the reds, while the whites include Albana, Trebbiano Romagnolo, Chardonnay and Bombino Bianco. In addition, the two areas differ by the fact that in Emilia the wines are predominantly sparkling, whereas they are still in Romagna.

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Medium 9781574411362

Columbus

Mary Faulk Koock University of North Texas Press ePub

COLUMBUS

I stopped off in Columbus on my way home from Houston to see Rosanne Harrison for a few minutes, but ended up spending the day! A number of the girls were over having coffee and making plans for next year’s Magnolia Arts and Homes Tour Festival. It was so successful this year. People came from far and wide and just loved the band concert on the courthouse square, consumed gallons and gallons of hand-turned ice cream, and drank ten thousand gallons of cold, fresh homemade lemonade at the sidewalk café while they watched the buggies and wagons start for the tours of old Columbus homes and the Old Opera House where Houdini once appeared. In the late 1880’s, this was the only place between New Orleans and El Paso where opera was performed. The builder, R. E. Stafford, millionaire, cattleman and banker, built his own two-story home adjacent to the Opera House at an angle where he could watch the performances from his own bedroom! Liza McMahan, who, with her husband, is editor of the hundred-and-five-year-old newspaper, was acting as chairman of the Festival. The girls were also talking about the party they had been to the night before down at the Taits’ place. It was El and Alice Tait’s thirtieth wedding anniversary, and their two daughters had sent out invitations simply saying, “A Special Occasion,” with the time and the place. Special it was indeed! The guests danced on the wide front porch, which was added to the log cabin built in 1847. The music was furnished by one of those good Schulenberg bands, the Telstars. Lil Stallman started a long serpentine procession to the shed behind the house, where an enormous white-satin-tied box held a “special gift” for Alice and El. Suddenly the top of the box flew open, and amid colorful balloons, Rita Tait and her fiancé emerged to announce their engagement. Rita was wearing her mother’s wedding gown and John was wearing El’s wedding suit. Toasts were exchanged by Rita and her father, and later all the guests offered toasts to both couples. May West, who is reportedly one of the “best cooks” in Columbus, had made the traditional Wedding Cake she makes for her special friends on such occasions. May is a wonderful friend to have, as she has the largest deep freeze in town and keeps it loaded with all kinds of goodies she loves to cook.

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Medium 9781574411362

The Hill Country

Mary Faulk Koock University of North Texas Press ePub

THE HILL COUNTRY

It is always refreshing to visit any part of the beautiful hill country; around Fredericksburg, Kerrville, Comfort, Stonewall or Mason. It is an area which is unique in many respects, due to our German forefathers who migrated from autocratic Germany to find a new home without oppression in Texas. My husband’s grandfather, Wilhelm Koock, was one of these German settlers. He established his home near Mason, at Koocksville. The old German-style stone house and store bearing his name are still there as strong as the day they were built.

We go to Koocksville every year to a family reunion, and it is a thrilling experience for us and our children. We have a great feast on the long shady porch of the quaint old house where Aunt Lola now lives. Dinner usually consists of:

Marvin Wagner’s Barbecued Beef and Lamb
Marguerite’s Cole Slaw and * German Potato Cakes
The Geistweidts always bring * Bread and Butter Pickles and
Sauerkraut in crocks and Peach Preserves put up by Anna Marie
and Aunt Lena. And also Aunt Lena’s delicate * Homemade Noodles.
We are usually greeted with the smell of Aunt Lola’s big loaves of bread
just out of the oven. She also has a good supply of freshly made
Schmierkase and Wild Plum Jam and butter, the only
freshly churned butter I know of anymore.
* Carlita makes a wonderful Potato Salad in a bowl so large
her husband, Marvin, has to carry it in.
Koockie and Vera furnish vine-ripened tomatoes, cucumbers and
onions sliced thin in sour cream and other fresh vegetables
all grown in their own garden.
The girls of the younger generation, Joyce, Gaelyn and Gretchen,
have an array of prizewinning cakes like I’ve never seen nor eaten before.

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